Links to Virginia and National Organizations

Virginia Organizations and Government Sites

     A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

  • Academy for Eating Disorders (www.aedweb.org) is a A multidisciplinary, international professional organization. Lists professions by discipline.
  • Alleghany Highlands Free Clinic (www.cfw.com/~ahfcfree) is a private non-profit agency that provides health care to families without insurance who have no other means of health care. The Free Clinic serves the counties of Alleghany and Bath and the cities of Clifton Forge and Covington. They provide specialized, acute and primary care for women as well as their families.
  • Alzheimers Association (www.alz.org) is a website of the national organization. It has links to the web sites (or address and phone number if there is no site) of the six Virginia chapters. The web site offers a calendar of events, recent news articles, and information about how to get involved with the organization.
  • American Association of University Women of Virginia (http://www.aauwofva.org) is part of the national AAUW; providing state and local opportunities to promote education and equity for all women and girls, lifelong education, and positive societal change. The website provides information on membership, branches, events, education issues, visibility, public policy, young members, and related links.
  • American Cancer Society - Virginia (search by zip code http://www.cancer.org/docroot/home/index.asp) offers information about the American Cancer Society, including programs that are offered, pending state legislation, and detection and prevention education.
  • American Heart Association - Virginia (http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=10000018&state=VA) gives the locations of the offices in Virginia and a schedule of upcoming events of the AHA, plus a link to the national homepage.
  • American Lung Association of Virginia (http://www.lungusa.org/virginia) has information on the organization and its tobacco, asthma and environmental health programs, its smog alert service, and its volunteering and donation opportunities. The site includes pages for each of the six Virginia offices, which focus on the specific programs and opportunities of each area.
  • Arthritis Foundation- Virginia Chapter (www.arthritis.org) offers various resources as well as specific information on local offices, conditions, treatments, events, programs, advocacy, donations, and research related to arthritis.
  • Dads and Daughters (http://www.thedadman.com/dadsanddaughters) helps fathers strengthen their relationship with their daughters and endeavors to override the pervasive messages that value young women more for how they look than who they are.
  • Eating Disorders Coalition (http://www.eatingdisorderscoalition.org) is a cooperative of non-profit organizations committed to federal advocacy on behalf of those with eating disorders, their families, and professionals working with these populations.
  • Fan Free Clinic (www.fanfreeclinic.org) offers health care, including counseling and education, to those who would not otherwise have access to care. The clinic focuses the Richmond metropolitan area and provides care to anyone requesting service.
  • 4-H (www.4-h.org) is a youth education branch of the Cooperative Extension Service, a program of the United States Department of Agriculture. The website offers links to resources, news, and technology concerning 4-H.
  • Inova Health System (www.inova.com) is a health care system based in Northern Virginia that consists of hospitals and other health services including home care, nursing homes, mental health services, wellness classes, and freestanding emergency and urgent care centers. The website also provides specific health information for women, children, men, seniors, and families.
  • League of Women Voters of Virginia (http://virginia.va.lwvnet.org/) is a multi-issue organization whose mission is to encourage the informed and active participation of citizens in government and to influence public policy through education and advocacy. The website presents information regarding local Leagues in Virginia, membership, publications, voting, elections, Virginia legislators, the Democracy Network, and links concerning federal and state legislation.
  • Life with Cancer Family Center (www.lifewithcancer.org) provides a wide variety of support services to cancer patients, families, and friends. Services include information and referrals, patient and family education, emotional support, short-term counseling, and education and training for professionals. The website includes information on the organization's history, mission, locations and hours of operation, descriptions of its programs, and links to informational cancer related web sites.
  • Mental Health America of Fredericksburg (http://www.mhafred.org/) provides resources and information of mental health providers in the Fredericksburg area, with a special page directed towards seniors. Also gives descriptions of all the organization's programs and links to other mental health sites.
  • Mental Health America of Virginia (www.mhav.org) provides information about the organization, including the chapters in Virginia and contact information, as well as a listing of upcoming events, recent public policy regarding mental health, and links to other websites regarding mental health, health, government and public service.
  • National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) (www.nationaleatingdisorders.org) is the primary comprehensive national organization dedicated to prevention and treatment. A wealth of information and links.
  • National Kidney Foundation of the Virginias (www.kidneyva.org) is committed to preventing kidney and urinary tract diseases, to improving the health and well-being of individuals and families affected by these diseases, and to increasing the availability of all organs for transplantation. The site provides data on organ donation, public and professional education, patient services, chapter events, and ways to get involved.
  • Northern Virginia Family Service (www.nvfs.org) provides services for families in need in the Northern Virginia area. The site offers information concerning adults, children, healthy families, foster care, employment training for low-income individuals, counseling services, job openings, thrift shops, and volunteer opportunities.
  • Northern Virginia Perinatal Council (NVPC) provides information on women's and children's health as it applies to their organization, and includes upcoming events, current research projects, text of their newsletter, and links to other related sites.
  • Planned Parenthood of the Blue Ridge (www.ppblueridge.org) provides professional, affordable reproductive health care and sexual health information in the western half of Virginia. Its medical and education centers are located in Blacksburg, Charlottesville, Lynchburg and Roanoke. The site supplies information on services such as gynecological examinations, birth control, emergency contraception, free pregnancy testing and counseling, abortions, prenatal care, HIV and STI testing and treatment, mid-life care, as well as other medical services.
  • Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington D.C. (http://www.ppmw.org/) offers comprehensive reproductive health care services, teen pregnancy prevention, family planning, breast and cervical cancer screening, and HIV/AIDS testing and counseling throughout the metropolitan area. Services also include emergency contraception, birth control, pregnancy testing and options counseling, annual exams, pap tests, STI testing and treatment, UTI diagnosis and treatment, colposcopies, mid-life services, surgical abortions, and medical abortions (RU486/Mifepristone).
  • Resources for Independent Living, Inc. (www.ril-va.org) assists persons who are severely disabled to live independently in the community and encourages necessary change within the community so independent living is a possibility. RIL serves individuals with disabilities in the counties of Charles City, Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, New Kent, Powhatan, & Prince George, and the cities of Richmond, Petersburg, Hopewell, & Colonial Heights.
  • Senior Navigator (www.seniornavigator.com) joins the power of information, convenience of Internet technology, and compassion of human relationships to offer help to older adults and their families as they navigate the many issues, systems, and decisions inherent in aging. The site offers information at the researcher’s convenience, in privacy and without judgement, and mobilizes professional and volunteer community resources to extend access to the Internet. It is backed by a trained volunteer team that links the resources of SeniorNavigator.com to individuals without access to the Internet.
  • Sexual Assault Victims Volunteer Initiative Crisis Center (http://www.vsdvalliance.org/secGetHelp/Directory%20of%20Services/certifiedsacc_s-y.html) offers assistance and support services to victims of sexual assault and child sexual abuse, and promotes public support and awareness through education and community services. SAVVI's service area includes Fauquier, Culpepper, Rappahannock, Madison and Orange Counties. The website includes a Help Line and information on sexual assault, its aftermath, SAVVI services, child abuse, signs of child abuse, and ways to protect children and help victims.
  • Smoke-Free Virginia (www.smokefreevirginia.org) includes a plan for and tips on quitting smoking, a directory of cessation resources and links to related web sites offering additional assistance, as well as contact information for the organization.
  • Something Fishy (www.something-fishy.org) has extensive information on signs of EDs, symbols, how to respond, treatment finder, etc.
  • University of Virginia Sexual Assault Education Office (http://womenscenter.virginia.edu/sdvs/) educates and offers support and advocacy to members of the community who have concerns about sexual assault, dating/ domestic violence, and stalking. The SAEO website supplies information on gendered violence, as well as services, legal rights, events, and various resources and links.
  • Virginia Association of Area Agencies on Aging (www.vaaaa.org) is composed of 25 agencies whose mission is to prepare, develop and implement an Area Plan for services to older citizens based on community input throughout each planning and service area; to serve as the advocate and focal point for aging issues and services throughout these designated areas; to provide accountability to local governments; and to ensure the availability and accessibility of a comprehensive coordinated system of services to older people.
  • Virginia Association of Free Clinics (www.vafreeclinics.org) is a membership organization whose mission is to strengthen and support Free Clinics and advocate for the populations they serve. The website offers information about VAFC, member clinics, Internet resources, and upcoming events.
  • Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance (www.vadv.org, formerly Virginians Against Domestic Violence and Virginians Aligned Against Sexual Assault) is a coalition of individuals, agencies and organizations committed to the elimination of sexual and domestic violence. This website includes information for individuals who have experienced domestic violence, professionals who want to increase the effectiveness of their response to domestic violence, as well as students and other Virginia residents/citizens who would like to know more about domestic violence & VADV.
  • Virginia Association of Health Plans (www.vahp.org) is committed to enhancing the acceptance and understanding of managed care organizations as high quality, cost-effective options for providing comprehensive health care to Virginia citizens. This website is a resource on managed care in Virginia for its members, consumers, health plan purchasers, legislators and members of the press.
  • Virginia Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (www.vamft.org) provides information about the organization, including contact information, as well as information about the Marriage and Family Therapy License in Virginia. There is also access to a searchable database for finding local licensed clinical members.
  • Virginia Breast Cancer Foundation (www.vbcf.org/index.htm) gives the history of the organization, its upcoming events, contact information, an online edition of the monthly newsletter, membership information, and links to other web sites of related organizations.
  • Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Institute for Women's Health (www.womenshealth.vcu.edu) is working to improve the health of women through health education, research, clinical care, and leadership development. The site includes information on these four divisions plus links to sites providing additional medical information, including the VCU Health System and VCU faculty, a calendar of events, and contact information.
  • Virginia Department of Health (www.vdh.state.va.us) provides links to the different departments and VDH programs, local health districts, and other organizations. VDH administration information includes the board of health members, VDH news releases, and the VDH organizational structure. The site provides contact information via email for questions regarding vaccinations, genealogy, restaurant sanitation, sewage and water services, emergency medical services, shellfish sanitation, and STDs/HIV.
  • VDH Office of Family Health Services (www.vahealth.org) contains information on fifty Virginia Department of Health programs that focus on strengthening the health of families and communities, plus risk avoidance tips and information on how certain issues affect public health. Among the programs are those that protect the health of women and infants, promote the health of children and adolescents, reduce injury and violence, and promote healthy lifestyle choices.
  • Virginia Health Care Foundation (www.vhcf.org) promotes and funds local public-private partnerships that increase access to primary health care services for medically underserved and uninsured Virginians. The web site includes information on types of organizations and specific programs it funds, grant applications, health-related jobs in Virginia, and ways of contributing to the organization.
  • Virginia NOW (http://www.vanow.org/) is an independent, local chapter of the National Organization for Women, which works to ensure equal rights for women, including the right to reproductive freedom, expression of sexuality, and equal access to educational and career paths. The website gives information on current NOW issues, meetings, news, history, and links.
  • Voices For Virginia's Children (www.vakids.org) is committed to building a powerful voice for children and inspiring the people of Virginia to act on their behalf. This site offers information on early child education, mental health, prevention of violence, legislative updates, KIDS COUNT, TEACH-VA, and other related links.
  • The Women's Initiative's (http://www.thewomensinitiative.org/) mission is to provide effective education, social support, and counseling services to empower women of all ages to transform challenging life situations into opportunities for personal growth and renewed well being.
  • Women's Center at Virginia Tech (www.womenscenter.vt.edu) was established to improve the culture and climate at Virginia Tech for students, faculty, and surrounding community members, both female and male. The center is committed to providing a comprehensive response to victims of sexual assault, rape, and other sex offenses and to providing outreach and education to prevent violence against women. The website offers information on related services, programs, events, and resources.

National Organizations and Federal Government Sites

     A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

  • Academy for Eating Disorders (http://www.aedweb.org/) is an international transdisciplinary, professional organization that promotes excellence in research, treatment and prevention of eating disorders. The AED provides training and a forum for collaboration and professional dialogue.
  • Administration for Children and Families (http://www.acf.hhs.gov) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funds state, local and tribal organizations to provide family assistance, child support, child care, Head Start, child welfare and other programs relating to children and families. The website has information on and links to the ACF's programs and to funding opportunities.
  • AgeWork (www.agework.com) is a web-based service that posts employment and funding opportunities for researchers interested in aging. Also provides links for federal government job opportunities and volunteer opportunities. The site is sponsored by the Gerontological Society of America, the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education, and the National Academy in an Aging Society.
  • The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) (www.ahrq.gov,formerly known as the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research) includes many AHRQ publications to help people make more informed health care decisions and to improve the quality of health care services. Its publications include information about diseases and conditions, prevention and wellness, health care plans, drugs, quality of care, smoking and surgery.
  • The Alliance for a Healthier Generation (www.healthiergeneration.org) is a partnership between the American Heart Association and the William J. Clinton Foundation that focuses on fighting childhood obesity.
  • Alzheimers Disease Research, a Program of the American Health Assistance Foundation (http://www.ahaf.org/) is a website of the national program providing information to fund research on and educate the public about Alzheimer's disease.
  • Alzheimer Research Forum (www.alzforum.org) provides information to serve the scientific and clinical research community. It creates and maintains web-based resources for researchers and discussion forums to promote debate, speed the dissemination of new ideas, and break down barriers across numerous disciplines that can contribute to the global effort to cure Alzheimer's disease.
  • American Academy of Family Physicians Patient Information (familydoctor.org) has information about diseases and conditions which you can search by topic or part of the body; interactive questions and answers regarding common health issues; and access to family health facts brochures. A search feature provides handouts, healthfacts, and flowcharts on a wide variety of issues regarding women.
  • American Chronic Pain Association (www.theacpa.org) offers support and information for people with chronic pain. It seeks to facilitate peer support and education for those with chronic pain and their families and to raise awareness among the health care community, policy makers, and the public at large about issues of living with chronic pain. It includes information on chronic pain and pain management, answers to frequently asked questions, and an online catalog.
  • American College of Nurse-Midwives (www.midwife.org), the oldest women's health care organization in the United States, provides research, accredits midwifery education programs, administers and promotes continuing education programs, establishes clinical practice standards, and creates liaisons with state and federal agencies and members of Congress. The website includes new releases, information on ACNM's history and structure, honors and awards, membership information, and a referral service for those wishing to find a midwife.
  • American Diabetes Association (www.diabetes.org) provides diabetes research, information and advocacy. The website offers links to basic diabetes information, Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, community campaigns, healthy living, news for health care professions, as well as patient referrals.
  • American Lung Association (www.lungusa.org) fights lung disease in all its forms, with special emphasis on asthma, tobacco control, and environmental health. The site has information on topics such as occupational health, diseases, school programs, programs, events, statistics, news, research, and publications.
  • AMA Health Insight (http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/3158.html) provides information about specific health topics and general health information on fitness, nutrition, antibiotics, a medical glossary, health while travelling, and finding a doctor or hospital.
  • Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (www.awhonn.org) is dedicated to serving the unique needs of nurses who specialize in the care of women and newborns. The association provides information on membership, news, events, services, practice resources, publications, and public policy.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (www.cdc.gov) web site has information about CDC research and data collection. The site has fact sheets on various health topics, travelers' health information, and prevention guidelines. CDC articles about women's health issues can be found in health topics A-Z under women's health.
  • The Collins Center, formerly Citizens Against Sexual Assault (CASA), (http://www.thecollinscenter.org/index.html) addresses the needs of women, men and children who have experienced the trauma of sexual violence, through crisis intervention, advocacy and support. The website provides information on CASA services and news, volunteer opportunities, criminal justice, teen programs and resources.
  • Complete Home Medical Guide (cpmcnet.columbia.edu) provides information on using the health care system, wellness, symptoms and diagnoses, first aid safety, the treatment and prevention of disease, and drugs. The Sloane Hospital for Women has a page located under obstetrics and gynecology, listed in the Academics and Clinical Departments section of the Patients and Visitors subheading. The site features information on their programs.
  • The Consumer Information Center (www.pueblo.gsa.gov/health.htm) has numerous free and low-cost federal publications on health and other topics. Its catalog and some publications are available on the web site.
  • Dads and Daughters (www.dadsanddaughters.org) helps fathers strengthen their relationships with their daughters and endeavors to override the pervasive messages that value young women more for how they look than for who they are.
  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (www.fda.gov) includes its catalogue and publications. Many concern health conditions and treatments and staying healthy. This site has a section on the FDA's Office of Women's Health, with information on guidance documents; scientific projects, press releases and publications regarding women's health; information on Take Time To Care, a national public awareness campaign about safe medicine use; links to other federal agencies' web sites; and a search engine for the FDA page.
  • The Foundation for Accountability (http://www.cahmi.org/) has a Child and Adolescent Health measurement initiative web site designed for anyone interested in measuring and improving health care quality for children and adolescents. The site contains general information as well as detailed, technical information about promoting healthy development.
  • Gurze Books (www.gurze.com) is a private company providing information on eating disorders and eating disorder education. Their free catalogue is a comprehensive resource.
  • Health Information for the Consumer (www.hsls.pitt.edu/chi) gives information about health topics, drugs, medical tests and procedures, keys to finding medical answers, and links to Internet resources including medical dictionaries and texts and databases.
  • Healthfinder (www.healthfinder.gov) is a gateway web site from the United States government. It links to a broad range of consumer health and human services information resources, and to non-profit, governmental, and educational organizations. It includes information in English and Spanish. The women's health information page offers links to health resources on topics such as breast cancer, depression and domestic violence, birth defect prevention and AIDS, and links to NWHIC references, support organizations, and news resources.
  • Intelihealth (www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH) provides information about diseases, conditions, drugs and general health topics, health news, "ask the doc," and a medical dictionary. It provides descriptions of and links to resources including other health web sites. The women's health section of the site includes news articles concerning women's health, features on certain women's health issues, an "ask the doc" question, general information on reproductive and breast health, links to other related areas, and articles directed towards women.
  • Jordan Institute for Families (http://ssw.unc.edu/jif/) is the research training and technical assistance arm of the School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Its website contains information on the Institute's projects and funding opportunities and links to related programs.
  • Laureate Psychiatric Hospital (www.laureate.com) conducts an eating disorders program with separate programs for adolescents and adults. Its site has information and resources.
  • Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (www.leukemia-lymphoma.org) is dedicated to fighting leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and offers information on patient services, blood-related diseases, research, professionals, and ways to help.
  • March of Dimes (www.modimes.org) includes information about research and programs to decrease birth defects, infant mortality, and low birthweight, and increase the number of women who get prenatal care; a health library with data on infant health and birth defects, public policy studies and free materials; special events.
  • Maternal and Child Health Library (www.mchlibrary.info) at the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health has a variety of electronic resources on maternal and child health, including MCH Alert, knowledge paths, NCEMCH publications, databases, bibliographies, and other materials developed for health professionals, families, and consumers.
  • MayoClinic Health Oasis (www.mayohealth.org) provides information from the Mayo Clinic including health news, reference articles, and "ask the Mayo physician." The women's health center section includes news headlines, quizzes, and related links.
  • Medical Library Association, Consumer and Patient Health Information Section (http://caphis.mlanet.org/) provides links to consumer health web sites that meet quality criteria. The contents of the linked sites are described. The Women's Health page can be found in the For Consumers section. It contains short descriptions of and links to five sites: National Women's Health Information Center, National Women's Health Resource Center, OBGYN.net - the "for women" section, Women's Health (from the Health Resources and Services Administration), and Women's Health Issues from Feminist.com.
  • MedicineNet (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/hp.asp) includes health-related news, health facts and doctors' views libraries, information regarding first aid and poisoning, searching capabilities, and links to other web sites. A search on women provides articles on various diseases and conditions.
  • National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center (http://aia.berkeley.edu/) seeks to improve the quality of social and health services delivered to infants and young children affected by drugs or HIV, to help their parents by providing training, technical assistance, research, resources, and offering information to professionals who serve these families. The website contains information on AIARC projects, training opportunities, and links to current and archival copies of AIARC's newsletter, "The Source."
  • National Association For Continence (www.nafc.org) educates the public about the causes, diagnosis categories, treatment options, and management alternatives for incontinence, voiding dysfunction, nocturnal enuresis, and related pelvic floor disorders. NAFC advocates on behalf of consumers who suffer from such symptoms as a result of disease or other illness; obstetrical, surgical or other trauma; or deterioration due to the aging process itself.
  • National Black Nurses Association (www.nbna.org) seeks to implement change to make available to African Americans and other minorities health care commensurate with that of the larger society. The website includes information on membership, leadership, programs, publications, health policy, and upcoming events.
  • National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (www.nccam.nih.gov) is dedicated to exploring complementary and alternative medical (CAM) practices in the context of rigorous science, training CAM researchers, and disseminating authoritative information.
  • National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (www.ncmhd.nih.gov) promotes minority health and leads, coordinates, supports, and assesses the NIH effort to reduce and ultimately eliminate health disparities. In this effort NCMHD performs basic clinical, social, and behavioral research, promotes research infrastructure and training, fosters emerging programs, disseminates information, and reaches out to minority and other health disparity communities.
  • National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) (http://ndep.nih.gov/) is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and more than 200 public and private organizations. The website contains information about diabetes and pre-diabetes for patients and for health, education, and business professionals, and includes slide presentations and other tools.
  • National Eating Disorders Association (www.nationaleatingdisorders.org) provides information about eating disorders and promotes access to quality treatment for those affected, and support for their families through education, advocacy, and research.
  • National Eye Institute (www.nei.nih.gov) directs and supports research that helps prevent and treat eye diseases and other disorders of vision.
  • National Health Information Center (http://www.health.gov/nhic/) The Center is a clearinghouse for health information. Its web site allows users to search its database of information about health-related organizations and resources by topic, and includes a listing of toll-free numbers for Federal government agencies, information centers and other clearinghouses.
  • National Institute on Aging (www.nia.nih.gov) leads a national program of research on the biomedical, social, and behavioral aspects of the aging process; the prevention of age-related diseases and disabilities; and the promotion of a better quality of life for all older Americans.
  • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (www.niaaa.nih.gov) NIAAA conducts research focused on improving the treatment and prevention of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems to reduce the enormous health, social, and economic consequences of this disease.
  • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (www.niaid.nih.gov/default.htm) performs studies to understand, treat, and ultimately prevent the myriad infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases that threaten millions of human lives.
  • National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (www.niams.nih.gov) NIAMS supports research on the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases, the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research, and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases.
  • National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (www.nichd.nih.gov) explores fertility, pregnancy, growth, development, and medical rehabilitation, and strives to ensure that every child is born healthy and wanted and grows up free from disease and disability.
  • National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (www.nidcd.nih.gov) carries out biomedical research and research training on normal mechanisms, as well as on the diseases and disorders of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech, and language that affect 46 million Americans.
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (www.nidr.nih.gov) provides leadership for a national research program designed to understand, treat, and ultimately prevent infectious and inherited craniofacial-oral-dental diseases and disorders.
  • National Institute on Drug Abuse (www.nida.nih.gov) uses the power of science to combat drug abuse and addiction through the support and conduct of research across a broad range of disciplines, as well as the rapid and effective dissemination of results of that research to improve drug abuse and addiction prevention, treatment, and policy.
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) (http://health.nih.gov/) has health hot lines, information about NIH programs and access to National Library of Medicine and NIH resources, including the MEDLINE database. MEDLINE contains citations and abstracts for articles in more than 3900 biomedical journals. MEDLINE is also available directly on the National Library of Medicine web site at (http://medlineplus.gov/).
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (www.ninds.nih.gov) examines the normal and diseased nervous system, fosters the training of investigators in the basic and clinical neurosciences, and seeks better understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of neurological disorders.
  • National Institute of Nursing Research (www.nih.gov/ninr) supports research to establish a scientific basis for the care of individuals across the life span--from the management of patients during illness and recovery to the reduction of risks for disease and disability; the promotion of healthy lifestyles; the promotion of quality of life in those with chronic illness; and the care for individuals at the end of life. This research may also include families within a community context by focusing on the special needs of at-risk and under-served populations, with an emphasis on health disparities.
  • National Mental Health Association (www.nmha.org) is the country's oldest and largest nonprofit organization addressing all aspects of mental health and mental illness. It works to improve the mental health of all Americans, especially the 54 million individuals with mental disorders, through advocacy, education, research, and service. The website details the organization's history, mission, and programs, and provides mental health information, links to related websites, and information about advocacy.
  • National Multiple Sclerosis Society- Central Virginia Chapter (www.nationalmssociety.org) promotes research, education, and advocacy to end to the devastating effects of multiple sclerosis. The website provides information on MS-related treatments, literature, news, research, educational programs, local chapters, and special events.
  • National Sexual Violence Resource Center (www.nsvrc.org) provides information and resources on sexual violence including statistics, research, position statements, statutes, training curricula, prevention initiatives and program information to assist coalitions, advocates and others interested in understanding and eliminating sexual violence.
  • National Women's Health Information Center (www.4women.gov) provides information on women's health including daily news updates, women's health related legislation and means to search the NWHIC publications and its organization database by topic.
  • Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) (www4.od.nih.gov/orwh/) of the National Institutes of Health includes information about its programs, including support of women in biomedical careers, research, the inclusion of women as research participants, a calendar of meetings, seminars and events, and recent news.
  • Parents Place (http://www.parentsplace.com) is an iVillage website devoted to pregnancy and parenting concerns.
  • Partners Against Pain (www.partnersagainstpain.com) provides information on pain management and assessment. The website is divided into sections for patients and caregivers, medical professionals, and institutions; it includes articles on pain and links to related sites and support groups and information on policy, regulatory and institutional compliance issues.
  • Renfrew Centers (www.renfrew.org) are non-profit organizations advancing the education, prevention, research, and treatment of eating disorders.
  • Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) (www.siecus.org) develops, collects, disseminates information on and promotes comprehensive education about sexuality. This site has the School Health Education Clearinghouse, library and information services, and sections regarding specific demographic and interest groups. It also has information about the organization, publications, and contains links to other organizations.
  • Society for Women's Health Research (http://www.womenshealthresearch.org) is the nation’s only non-profit organization whose mission is to improve the health of all women through research, education and advocacy. The Society encourages the study of sex differences between women and men that affect the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease.
  • Something Fishy (www.something-fishy.org) contains information on signs of eating disorders, how to respond, and a treatment finder.
  • Volunteers in Health Care (www.volunteersinhealthcare.org/home.htm) is a resource for health care providers looking to organize or expand volunteer-led medical and dental services for the uninsured in their communities. Its resources include information on legislation and funding by state, news and events, its programs (Rxassist and Give Back a Smile), and literature on patient assistance programs, dental field reports, and running a volunteer organization.
  • The Office of National AIDS Policy (http://www.hhs.gov/ophs/ohap/) has a useful links section organized by topics such as 'Prevention and Education', 'Research and Treatment' as well as state, global and population group information.
  • Zero to Three (National Center for Infants and Toddlers) (http://www.zerotothree.org) promotes the healthy development of infants and toddlers. It disseminates developmental information, trains providers, promotes model approaches and standards of practice, and works to increase public awareness of the significance of the first three years of life.